The low down on microchips

There is one thing that of veterinary care cannot prevent and that is a lost pet. According to HomeAgain, “1 in 3 pets goes missing during its lifetime”, including those indoor cats that NEVER go outside and for this reason microchipping is recommended. Veterinary hospitalsMicrochipping like Quail Hollow Animal Hospital, in Wesley Chapel, FL offer microchipping services to help make the chances that a lost pet will get back to his or her family a little higher.

Terrie Roberts, CVT at Quail Hollow explains microchip implantation can be done during an already scheduled anesthetic procedure or while the pet is awake. A microchip is about the size of a grain of rice and is injected, much like a vaccine, under the skin. Every chip is biocompatible so as to not cause any adverse reactions once implanted. Also, microchips are permanent, so once the chip is placed it will always be there!

The way a microchip works, is that each chip contains its own special number that is linked to information that could reunite the pet with its family. Once the microchip is implanted, the pet is registered with the owner’s information with a pet recovery service that has access to a national database. Registering with the recovery service is the most important step of the process. Should that pet go missing and be found, any vet facility or shelter will be able to scan for the microchip number and search the pet recovery service with that number. Once the pet’s information is found, the family can then be contacted. A microchip is only as helpful as the information linked to it.

Occasionally, pets are found with microchips that have outdated information. The key to microchip maintenance is to keep contact information current in case a pet does become lost. For more information about microchipping, refer to www.public.HomeAgain.com.

Hurricane Preparations Plan for your Pet

“When disaster strikes, preparation makes all the difference,” states Dr. John Manolukas, DVM, at Hanover Regional Animal Hospital in Wilmington, NC.  If it is not safe for you, it is not safe for them.  Make a plan and assemble an emergency kit for yourself and your pet.

Start getting ready now!

ID your pet

Ÿ  Microchip – A simple injection can place a rice-sized microchip permanently in your pet. Hanover Regional Animal Hospital will register your pet for you, and provide online access to change any information.  This is the best wiStock_000004089992XSmall_jpgay to ensure your pet can be identified.

Ÿ  Collar – Make sure your cat or dog is wearing a collar with identification.  The information should include your cell number, pet’s name and if possible the name of a friend or relative outside your area who will be able to contact you if you have to evacuate.  For cats, we recommend break away collars.

Put together a disaster kit. (see instructions below)

If you evacuate, take your pet. If it is not safe for you then it is not safe for them. Remember, while you may plan to return in a day or so, sometimes it can take days to weeks before you can get back to your house.

Plan for a place to stay ahead of time. 

Friends and relatives. This is the best choice – as long as they live out of the path of the storm, tornado or hurricane, and your pets get along with theirs.   

Hotels.

Ÿ  Contact multiple hotels within a targeted safe zone and find out their pet policy.  Be sure to ask about their policies in evacuation situations.

Ÿ  Ask about any restrictions on number, size, and species.

Ÿ  Inquire if the “no pet” policies would be waived in an emergency.

Ÿ  Keep a list of animal-friendly places handy, and call ahead for a reservation as soon as you think you might have to leave your home.

Ÿ  Online resources for pet-friendly hotels:

     Doginmysuitcase.com

     Pet-friendly-hotels.net

     Pets-allowed-hotels.com

     Petswelcome.com 

Consider a kennel or veterinarian’s office.

Ÿ  Make a list of boarding facilities and veterinary offices that might be able to shelter animals in disaster emergencies.

Ÿ  Be ready for everyday emergencies – have your first aid kit ready to go. 

If you stay home, do it safely.

Plan and prepare a safe zone.

Ÿ  Gather the pets in the same safe location as the rest of family.  Identify a location where you all can stay together and make the safe area animal friendly.

Ÿ  Close off or eliminate unsafe nooks and crannies where frightened cats may try to hide.

Ÿ  Move dangerous items such as tools or toxic products that have been stored in the area.

Ÿ  Be sure to close your windows and doors, stay inside, and follow the instructions from your local emergency management office.

As soon as you know trouble is on the way.

Ÿ  Bring your pets indoors as soon as local authorities say trouble is on the way.

Ÿ  Keep pets under your direct control; if you have to evacuate, you will not have to spend time trying to find them.

Ÿ  Keep dogs on leashes and cats in carriers, and make sure they are wearing identification.

Ÿ  If you have a room you can designate as a “safe room,” put your emergency supplies in that room in advance.

Ÿ  Listen to the radio periodically, and don’t come out until you know it’s safe. 

Take care even after the disaster.

Keep taking care even after the disaster.  There are many dangers following a disaster, some of which are on the ground and in locations our pets are more likely to visit than us.  Be sure to scout out any area your pet will be investigating.

Ÿ  Your home may be a very different place after the emergency is over, and it may be hard for your pets to adjust.

Ÿ  Don’t allow your pets to roam loose. Familiar landmarks and smells might be gone, and your pet may be disoriented. Pets can easily get lost in such situations.

Ÿ  While you assess the damage, keep dogs on leashes and cats in carriers inside the house. If your house is damaged, your pets could escape.

Ÿ  Be patient with your pets after a disaster. Try to get them back into their normal routines as soon as possible. Be ready for behavioral problems caused by the stress of the situation. If these problems persist, or if your pet seems to be having any health problems, talk to your veterinarian.

Ÿ  If your community has been flooded, search your home and yard for wild animals who may have sought refuge there. Stressed wildlife can pose a threat to you and your pet. 

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How to put together a disaster kit

Keep the disaster kit in a duffle bag that can be grabbed quickly if you have to evacuate in a hurry.

Food and Water

Food: (per day amounts)

5 days worth of food for each pet, bowls and a can opener if you are using canned food.

       Dry food – 1 cup per 20-25 lbs of pet is a rough estimate.

Water: (per day amounts)

Dog                                          Cats

30 lbs  ¼ gallon    (4 cups),       Small Cats    1 cup

60 lbs  ½ gallon    (8 cups),       Medium Cat  2 cups

90 lbs  ¾ gallon  (12 cups)         Large Cat     3 cups

Medications and medical records. 

Ÿ  Write down your pets’ feeding schedules, medical conditions and behavior issues in case you need to board them.

Ÿ  Keep your veterinarian’s name and number with you.  A business card works great.

Ÿ  Make sure to have photos of you and your pets, to help identify them in case of separation and to prove ownership.  Microchips are still the best method of permanent identification.

Ÿ  Place a copy of all medical records in a waterproof container. These should contain any identification information such as a microchip and rabies certificates as well as county licenses.

First-aid kit. Place your pet first aid kit in a waterproof container in the disaster duffel. 

Plan for waste. Litter box, litter and garbage bags for collection of pets’ waste.

Control of pets.

Ÿ  Carriers – for safe transport of pets and to prevent escape.

Ÿ  Pillowcases – you should have a pillowcase for each cat and small dog to aid in capture and control.

Ÿ  Leashes and harnesses – to maintain control of your pets when they are under stress.

Comfort items – blankets bed and toys if convenient, to reduce stress.

 

Why microchip your pet?

Is your pet not microchipped? Well, then, it's a great time to make an appointment to have that done.

Is your pet not microchipped? Well, then, it’s a great time to make an appointment to have that done.

Don’t forget, August 15 is National Check the Chip Day! Thousands of pets become lost every day, and microchip identification is the one reliable way to reunite these lost pets with their owners. The procedure is safe, easy, inexpensive, and practically painless.

The microchip itself is about the size of a grain of rice. It contains a tiny metallic “bar code” surrounded by an inert membrane which makes it non-reactive when it is placed under the skin. The microchip is injected under the skin between the shoulder blades with a hypodermic-type syringe. Although the needle itself is larger than those used for vaccinations, most pets don’t seem to notice any more than any other injection. Once the chip is in place, it should be there for the life of the pet, and we will register your microchip to ensure your contact information is associated with the bar code number.

If the pet becomes lost, all animal care facilities (shelters, veterinary hospitals, pounds, etc) will scan the pet for a microchip, using a special microchip reader that is simply waved over the skin. These scanners are very reliable and easy to use. Once a microchip is found, a special hotline is called, and the lost pet is reported. The pet owner is then called immediately and given the contact information about where to pick up their pet.

Regardless of the type of chip, every pet should have microchip ID. Some owners feel that their pet doesn’t need identification because it is always in the house, but in our experience these are the most likely pets to become lost when they get outside by accident. As separation from your pet can happen all too easily, appropriate identification, ideally permanent identification by use of microchip, is critical. Industry figures claim that 8,000 pets every day are located and returned home because they have a microchip; your pet should be protected!

Take this opportunity to check your pets’ microchip registration and make sure the information is up-to-date. Is your pet not microchipped? Well, then, it’s a great time to make an appointment to have that done. Search for a local veterinarian in your area here: http://www.youranimalhospital.com/

Looking for a pet? Click here to access the Universal Pet Microchip Lookup: www.petmicrochiplookup.org

A happy reunion for Tanner

TannerTanner, a very friendly six-year-old pug mix, was brought in to Best Friends Animal Hospital in Chambersburg, PA after he was discovered walking alongside a nearby road. He was scanned to see if he had a microchip and sure enough he did! As a result, the clinic was able to locate Tanner’s family in Maryland.

The family expressed to the clinic that he had been missing for nearly 3.5 years. As you can imagine, when they came to the clinic to see the pug, it was a very special reunion indeed. The video of their reunion was posted on the clinic’s Facebook page and received an incredible amount of exposure with close to 300 “likes” and 60 re-posts. Click here to watch footage!

With such a positive ending, this is great enforcement to all pet owners out there on the importance of microchipping.

Welcome Home, Tanner!